Art assets for the Game Course?


#1

Hi, @PaulSolt! Where can I download the art assets you use during the course, like in: http://learn.iphonedev.tv/lecture/132711/22-tutorial-add-a-spaceship-as-a-skspritenode-to-the-screen Thanks.


#2

http://learn.iphonedev.tv/lecture/132705/course-video-downloads


#3

Hi Paul, if we develop our own game, we will have to create our own characters, weapons, background, accessories etc. So for each art asset item, how many different resolution types do we need to create? 4 (2x and 3x for iPhone and 1x and 2x for iPad)?

What would be the best tool to create these art assets? Photoshop? Pixelator? Sketch 3?

Can you provide some possible ways or resources that we can consider?

Thanks a lot~!


#4

Yes at least the 2x, 3x on iPhone and 1x, 2x on iPad.

Use the iOS resolution quick reference. I printed it and put it on my wall in my office.

It keeps changing each year, so those are the export resolutions. But you MUST have your artist work in higher resolutions so your original assets are big enough to use either in video trailers, icons, brochures, Mac apps, or new devices that Apple launches.

I recommend 2048x2048 for characters as a minimum resolution when working on the original asset, which you then will export to the device specific resolutions (depends on in-game usage).

For game backgrounds my artist is currently using a large resolution (3x iPad resolution) of 3072x2304, since it’s bigger than any of the current devices. But it might make sense to work with something larger. Background resolutions are a little bit tricky, since you have to move around layers to get the backgrounds to work for different output resolutions/aspect ratios of the devices (iPhone 6 Plus: 2208x1242, iPad retina: 2048x1536, etc).

Workflow Steps

  1. My artist uses Photoshop or Illustrator at 2048x2048
  2. I use Sketch 3 to export the images at different @2x, @3x resolutions for use in game (sizes depend on how big you want to show the game object).
  3. Any updates to images get added to my Sketch document and I reexport and import those assets into Xcode again (clean/re-build game).

I do plan on discussing working with an artist (game art proposal), managing an artist (basecamp.com + dropbox), exporting device specific art assets, and using in-game assets.

Let me know what you think. That will probably be an extra lesson towards the end of the course.


#5

Thanks, Paul. I have a better idea now.

Moving forward, as a general guide we should work based on 3x the max. resolution of current available iPad device in order to future proof it and not to overkill the requirements. Am I right?

I didn’t try out the Sketch 3, but I think it is primarily used for logo design and typography design, and not so much of creating character, background, weapon, special effects etc. Is Sketch 3 essential? Do you encourage us to purchase the software? The software cost $99.

For art assets, which format should we work on? vector formats?

Any resources that we can tap on?

Hope you can include a couple of lesson to cover on these areas, in terms on art assets preparation and understanding the technicalities on managing images and art forms.


#6

Good stuff.

I wonder if we could use PaintCode with SpriteKit. I’ll dig into that.

http://www.paintcodeapp.com


#7

If it makes paths, I think you can draw paths in Sprite Kit.


#8

I would keep it simple.

Source resolutions (high resolution)

  • Characters: 2000x2000
  • Backgrounds: 4000x3000
  • UI buttons: 1000x1000 - 2000x2000 (depending on size of UI component

Using these resolutions, I would then export assets that are designed to be displayed on screen (much smaller).

Characters
A spaceship design might only take up 1/5 of the width of the screen in portrait on iPhone 6, and 1/4th of screen on iPad portrait. Here’s some basic math you could use to figure out proper dimensions… seeing it and play testing will give you the best idea for what size your art needs to be.

Without knowing how big things are, it’s best to have your artist (or you) work at the high resolutions so that you can decide what size the game art is going to need to be.

iPhone
1/5 = 0.20
0.20 * 750 points (iPhone 6) = 150 points wide

150x150 points for the size of the ship.

@1x export would be 150x150 pixels
@2x export would be 300x300 pixels
@3x export would be 450x450 pixels

iPad (slightly bigger on iPad 1/4th screen)
0.25 * 768 points (portrait iPad) = 192x192

192x192 points for size of ship
@1x export would be 192x192 pixels
@2x export would be 384x384 pixels

With that said, this is just a starting point. You might decide that instead of making the characters bigger on iPad/iPhone 6+, you want to show more of the game world and use the same sizes across iPhone/iPad. It’s up to you, but you need to test it out.

Backgrounds
Doing backgrounds is a little tricky because the different iOS devices have different aspect ratios.

If you start with a large background you can make it work multiple ways.

Basic approach would be to create a large background and then just crop it to each device resolution.
A better approach would be to use multiple layers and then you’d create separate documents for each device size and then copy the layers into the new documents. Update the position/scale of any of the layers to fit the aspect ratio (We did this with Bomb Dodge’s background on iPhone vs. iPad)

As long as your source file is bigger, you’ll have options for making the background fit appropriately.

I didn’t try out the Sketch 3, but I think it is primarily used for logo design and typography design, and not so much of creating character, background, weapon, special effects etc. Is Sketch 3 essential? Do you encourage us to purchase the software? The software cost $99. - Jason

I love the ease of use when exporting art assets from Sketch. In Photoshop it was a real pain.

Your best bet is to use the trial software, watch some tutorials, and see if that helps you leverage the apps.

My artists all work predominantly with Photoshop (pixel based art), not vectors. That also comes down to art style. With vectors you can scale to any size, but you have limitations on the art style. Vectors aren’t good for high detail that you can achieve with raster graphics (Photoshop).

I use Sketch and Photoshop CC 2015.

I did buy Pixelmator and Acorn, but I found both lacked features that I used extensively in Photoshop (That was a while ago, so I think those issues don’t exist anymore).

Many of these companies have student discounts if you’re still in school, so that might also help reduce the cost.

For art assets, which format should we work on? vector formats?
Any resources that we can tap on?
Hope you can include a couple of lesson to cover on these areas, in terms on art assets preparation and understanding the technicalities on managing images and art forms. -Jason

It depends on your skills and or your art style for the game.

Links